Before & After: Lee Konitz

A memorable Lee Konitz moment occurred just before we met. Stepping off the elevator on his hotel floor, I heard the faint sound of an alto saxophone gradually growing louder as I walked toward his room. I stood outside his door listening to him practice, transfixed by his sound and melodic variations. Eventually, he took a break, which broke the spell and I knocked. For this B&A, the 82 year-old Konitz was characteristically outspoken and unguarded. Continue reading

Before & After: Jimmy Heath

photo © Larry Appelbaum

You can learn a lot about jazz hanging with Jimmy Heath. The saxophonist, arranger and bandleader has worked with nearly every important jazz musician of the post-war period, and his many compositions, including the jazz standards “Gingerbread Boy” and “C.T.A.,” are performed and recorded around the world. The Philly-born, NEA Jazz Master spent many years teaching, and he’s shared a lifetime of behind-the-scenes stories in his recent autobiography, I Walked With Giants. He is still actively playing and recording, and his latest release with his younger brother Tootie is The Heath Brothers: Endurance (JLP). This B&A was conducted in front of a live audience at the 2011 Mid-Atlantic Jazz Festival.

1. James Moody

“I’m In The Mood For Love ” (from The Very Best of Prestige). Moody, alto sax; Leppe Sundwal, trumpet; Thore Swanerud, piano; Yngve Akerberg, bass; Jack Noren, drums. Recorded 1949. Continue reading

Before & After: Joe Morris

Joe Morris may be inspired by the traditions of Chicago blues, free-jazz and West African music, but the 47 year-old guitarist, bassist and bandleader continues to develop his own musical language and vocabulary. While the New Haven-born musician and composer is currently on the faculty in the Jazz and Improvisation Department at the New England Conservatory, he still tours the new music circuit with his own groups, and also collaborates with fellow creative improvisers William Parker, Joe Maneri, Matthew Shipp, Lawrence “Butch” Morris, and Ken Vandermark. In the last two decades, Morris’s intricately edgy innovations have been documented on nearly 30 recordings for various labels, including ECM, Aum Fidelity, Omnitone, Knitting Factory, Leo, Soul Note, and hatOLOGY.

 

1. Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane
“Why Was I Born?” (from Kenny Burrell & John Coltrane, Prestige OJCCD 300-2). Recorded in 1958. Kenny Burrell, guitar; John Coltrane, tenor saxophone

BEFORE: The guitarist has a great sound. Is this Jim Hall? No, he’s not playing like Jim Hall. His voicings are bigger. I’m trying to figure out who the saxophonist is, but it’s hard because it’s so plainly stated.  Oh, it’s Coltrane and Kenny Burrell. One little inflection and one note gave it away. Well that makes sense why it sounds so incredibly clear and the guitarist’s sound is so good. I haven’t listened to this since I was a kid. Kenny plays such choice notes and he’s impeccable in his technique. His time is really good and his sound is really great. He and Joe Pass and Grant Green are so great that they’re beyond criticism, you know?

AFTER: Before Kenny Burrell played like that, no one played like that. It’s just as much about invention as it is about being correct.  For as long as I’ve been playing the guitar it’s been assumed that that’s the correct way to play. I don’t think it was the correct way for Kenny Burrell. It was the creative way for Kenny Burrell. And without him, and Herb Ellis, and Sal Salvador and guys like that, that style of playing never would have existed. They invented that creative way of playing the guitar and that’s why they’re great.

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